ashleyrey

Suggested price:   Less than 3¢ per word
Location:  Hurricane, WV
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Biography

Hi, my name is Ashley! I am a freelance content writer and I love writing about horses. I studied Equine Science and Agricultural Economics at the University of Kentucky and I have worked for several horse farms. I love writing about general product promotions and have written about various topics ranging from horse trailers to garage doors.

EDUCATION:  None provided BLOG:  None provided
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Writing Sample

Mechanical horse walkers are made in various designs. The most common design consists of four arms of heavy gauge steel that radiate from a central pivot point. The central pivot point contains a motor that moves the steel arms at various speeds. At the end of each arm is a short nylon rope with a snap at the end to attach to the horse's halter. The horse on the walker moves in a circle, and the walker may be set to go in either direction.

The motor is typically on a timer that will stop after a preset amount of time or a set number of rotations. Some of the other designs include a type of horse walker that has shifting panels without the radial arms, and a different kind includes paneled boxes without a rope attaching to the horse. The lack of attachment in the moving box allows the horse to move more naturally.

Many horse walkers are programmable so that each horse is given proper exercise based on the individual horse's needs and present ability. Some horse walkers only allow the horse to walk or trot while others, especially the larger walkers, permit the horse to canter and gallop.

Performance horses may suffer injuries that require box rest and time to heal. These injuries may require a rehabilitation schedule and an individual exercise program to help speed up the recovery process without straining the injury. Horse walkers are important additions to a yard such as a competitive, breeding, or training yard in the event of injuries, and the need for rehabilitation.