CherylB

Suggested price:   13¢ to 16¢ per word
Location:  Crawford, TN
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Biography

Cheryl has been writing professionally since 2007 and has published two family law e-books. She has an associate's degree in Paralegalism and has worked for two law offices since 2004. After she left the second law office, she went back to the first law office as an independent paralegal and worked from home. Cheryl continues to take attorney clients for drafting correspondence and pleadings. In addition to the two family law e-books, Cheryl has written hundreds of articles and blog posts on family law, bankruptcy, personal injury, civil law, contracts and criminal law.

Prior to working for attorneys, Cheryl owned an automotive repair shop with her husband. Her job duties included ordering parts, office management, HR and auto repair. She has written thousands of articles and blog posts on the newest makes and models and hundreds of "how to" articles on car and truck repair. Cheryl also writes about motorcycles, UTVs, ATVs, boats, motor homes, travel trailers, fifth wheels and other recreational vehicles.

Cheryl also likes to cook and write about food. She was accepted to Prue Leith's School of Food and Wine at the London, England campus. She often makes up new dishes at home and has several tried and true recipes stored in her head.

Cheryl also writes about pets, especially dogs. She has done several articles and blog posts about the feeding and care of dogs.

Cheryl also rides motorcycles, drag races and likes to travel. She lives with her husband, umbrella cockatoo and German shepherd dog.

Cheryl's hobbies include reading, crocheting, listening to music and woodworking.

EDUCATION:  A.S. Legal Studies from Manchester Comm. Coll. & UT BLOG:  None provided
CERTIFICATIONS:  None provided CURRICULUM VITAE:  None provided

Niches

  • Automobile
  • Business & Marketing
  • Family Life
  • Finance & Economics
  • Food & Drink
  • General
  • Home & Garden
  • Law
  • Medical
  • Outdoors
  • Personal Finance
  • Pets & Animals
  • Real Estate
  • Women
  • Writing & Blogging

Writing Sample

SAMPLE 1

In today’s age of technology, many attorneys and their staff prefer to email or fax documents to you, or even to correspond with you via e-mail. It is a good idea to have an email address that is secure — one your spouse does not have access to — to make communication easier for an attorney. Often, your attorney may not have time to get into a phone conversation with you, but may be able to answer a question much quicker via email, while he or she is waiting for the next client or between drafting documents.

E-mail also provides another benefit. It allows the attorney to get a document to you quicker. Rather than having you come to the office to pick up a time-sensitive document, the attorney or his or her staff can e-mail you the document. This saves not only saves you time, but it prevents you from having to take time off work to visit the office. It also helps to keep your retainer down, as the attorney will charge you minimally to send an e-mail, but if you visit the office, that visit could cost you 15 minutes or better.

SAMPLE 2

How to Replace a Timing Belt on a 1996 Honda Accord

The 1996 Honda Accord 2.2-liter engine has what is commonly known as “two timing belts.” One of the belts is the balancer shaft belt, and this belt should also be changed when you change the timing belt. The 2.2-liter engine is an interference engine--if the belt stretches too much or breaks, the valves will most likely hit the pistons and cause extensive internal damage. Honda recommends that you change the timing belt every 90,000 miles or 72 months, whichever comes first, but several mechanics recommend that you change it at 60,000 miles or 60 months, whichever comes first. You will need a special tool--an M6 x 100 mm bolt, which can be purchased at any Honda dealership if you do not have one lying around.

Remove the Balance Shaft Belt

Disconnect the battery negative cable and lay it aside. Raise the front of the Accord with the floor jack and support it with jack stands. Support the engine by placing a board on the floor jack, then push the floor jack under the oil pan and jack it up just so it touches the bottom of the oil pan. Remove the left front wheel.

Remove the lower splashguard and speed control actuator, but leave the control cable connected to the speed control actuator--just lay it out of the way. The air conditioning compressor and the alternator belt is tensioned by moving the alternator. Loosen the upper pivot nut and the lower locknut, then turn the adjustment bolt on the lower bracket. Turn the bolt counterclockwise to reduce the tension. Remove the belt.

To remove the Accord’s power steering pump belt, loosen the locknut and lower pivot nut for the power steering pump. Turn the adjustment bolt on the pump’s upper bracket counterclockwise to loosen the tension. Remove the belt.

Remove the left engine mount. Unsnap the alternator wiring from the valve cover. Remove the alternator and its support bracket. Remove the valve cover and the upper timing belt cover. Leave the lines on the back of the power steering pump, and unbolt the pump. Lay the pump out of the way. Work the dipstick tube back and forth and pull it out of the block.

Turn the crankshaft counterclockwise until the white timing mark on the crankshaft is lined up with the timing mark on the block. Check the timing marks on the camshaft. The camshaft has three marks: the letters “UP,” which should be at the 12 o’clock position, and two timing dots at the 3 o’clock and 9 o’clock positions on the camshaft sprocket.

Remove the crankshaft pulley bolt, then pull the crankshaft pulley off the nose of the crankshaft. Remove the tensioner adjusting bolt rubber seal and the Honda Accord’s lower timing belt cover.

Install the M6 x 100 mm bolt in the block to lock the tensioner arm. Loosen the tensioner nut, then push the tensioner away from the belt. Tighten the nut enough to hold the tensioner out of the way. Remove the balancer shaft belt by lifting it off the sprockets and pulleys. Unbolt and remove the balancer shaft sprocket.

Remove and Install the Timing Belt

Check that the crankshaft timing marks are still lined up. Loosen the tensioner locking bolt. Loosen the tensioner nut, then push the tensioner away from the belt. Tighten the nut enough to hold the tensioner out of the way. Lift the timing belt off the sprockets and pulleys. Make sure all the timing marks on the crankshaft and camshaft are still lined up.

Install the timing belt working in a clockwise direction, starting on the crankshaft sprocket, then over the top of the camshaft, keeping tension on the belt between the two sprockets. Work your way down to the outside of the Accord’s water pump pulley, then inside the tensioner pulley.

Loosen the tensioner nut. The tensioner will put tension on the timing belt. Temporarily install the balancer shaft belt sprocket on the crankshaft, the lower timing belt cover and the crankshaft pulley. Turn the crankshaft counterclockwise six turns until the white timing mark on the crankshaft is lined up at the 12 o’clock position. Make sure all three timing marks on the camshaft are lined up.

Remove the crankshaft pulley, the lower timing belt cover and the balancer shaft belt sprocket. Turn the crankshaft counterclockwise until three teeth of the camshaft pass the timing mark. Loosen the tensioner nut, allowing the tensioner to put tension on the timing belt. Tighten the tensioner nut to 33 foot-pounds of torque. Tighten the tensioner locking bolt enough to hold the tensioner in place.

Install the Balance Shaft Belt

Check that all the timing marks are still lined up. Check that the balancer shaft timing marks are lined up at the 9 o’clock position on the left balancer shaft (as you are looking down at the engine). Remove the cylinder block plug and insert the M6 x 100 mm bolt into the plug hole.

Rotate the rear balancer shaft until the bolt locates in the shaft. The bolt should slide in 2.9 inches. Install the balancer shaft belt sprocket on the crankshaft, then install the balancer shaft belt on the crankshaft sprocket, over the top of the two balancer shafts and under the tensioner.

Loosen the tensioner nut. The tensioner will put tension on the belts. Remove the M6 x 100 locking bolt. Temporarily install the crankshaft pulley, so you can see the timing mark. Turn the crankshaft counterclockwise one turn. Tighten the tensioner bolt to 33 foot-pounds of torque.

Remove the tensioner locking bolt. Install the rest of the parts in reverse order of removal. Tighten the crankshaft pulley bolt to 181 foot-pounds of torque.